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Top 3 Tendencies

Holding You Back From Truly
Mastering Your Productivity

The high achiever, controller, and hypervigilance tendencies are driven by a need for independence, acceptance, and security respectively, and often result in self-sabotage.

You will learn how to identify self-sabotaging tendencies and how they are impacting the people around you.

If you're feeling frustrated because you're not sure how to have tough conversations with patients or you're worried you might say the wrong thing, then this episode is for you!

In this week's episode, I cover:

1. The psychological concept of self-sabotage โ€“ why we get in our own way and how to recognize and shut down self-sabotaging tendencies

2. The high achiever tendency โ€“ how it can be motivated by a need for acceptance and how it can lead to unsustainable habits and a loss of touch with reality

3. The hyper-vigilance tendency โ€“ how it can be driven by a need for security and how it can lead to skepticism and a lack of trust in others.

Subscribe ๐Ÿ”” and listen ๐Ÿ”Što this episode nowโ—

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Show Summary

Do you ever find yourself not reaching your goals? Or once you have a dream or an idea, something always goes wrong? That's because we have self-sabotaging tendencies. We get in our own way! I'm going to show you the 3 Sabotaging Tendencies that were used to get 1. Self-awareness 2. Improved performance 3. Greater satisfaction. I'll outline how I did it in detail, but first, let's break down some of the things that make me relatable.

If you're struggling to get ahead and feel like you're constantly sabotaging your own success, this episode is for you. You'll learn about the three main sabotaging tendencies and how to overcome them for good.

I was facing the problem of self-sabotaging tendencies. I was not able to get all of my goals done, or once I had a dream, I was not able to achieve it. I needed to recognize these tendencies quicker so that I could shut them down and pivot into what we call the sage part of our brain. The three big tendencies are controlling, high achiever, and hypervigilance. Controlling is motivated by independence and high achiever is motivated by acceptance. Hypervigilance is motivated by security.

Here are the steps you need to follow to also get 1. Self-awareness 2. Improved performance 3. Greater satisfaction:

  1. Recognize the sabotaging tendency
  2. Shut it down
  3. Pivot to the sage part of the brain

1. Recognize the sabotaging tendency

In order to recognize a sabotaging tendency, it is important to be aware of the different thoughts and emotions that may be associated with it. For example, a common sabotaging tendency is the need to control everything. This may be motivated by a fear of failure or a need for acceptance. When this tendency is in play, individuals may feel anxious, impatient, and angry. They may also find it difficult to work with others and may be quick to criticize. Recognizing these thoughts and emotions can help to identify a sabotaging tendency.

 

Another sabotaging tendency is perfectionism. This may be motivated by a fear of failure or a need for approval. When this tendency is in play, individuals may feel anxious, stressed, and depressed. They may also find it difficult to start or finish projects and may be critical of themselves and others. Recognizing these thoughts and emotions can help to identify a sabotaging tendency. Still another sabotaging tendency is procrastination. This may be motivated by a fear of failure or a need for perfection. When this tendency is in play, individuals may feel anxious, stressed, and overwhelmed. They may also find it difficult to start or finish projects and may put off important tasks. Recognizing these thoughts and emotions can help to identify a sabotaging tendency.

2. Shut it down

If you find yourself in a situation where you're feeling anxious or stressed about something, it's important to take a step back and recognize what might be causing those feelings. One of the main causes of anxiety and stress is the tendency to try and control everything. This can be motivated by a fear of not being able to handle things on your own, or a need to be in control in order to feel secure. When this tendency starts to take over, it's important to be aware of it and to try and let go of the need to control everything. This can be a difficult process, but it's important to remember that not everything needs to be controlled in order to be successful. Instead, focus on the end goal and on what you can do to achieve it. This will help to reduce anxiety and stress, and will also allow you to be more open to opportunities.

 

One way to combat the need to control everything is to focus on your end goals. What is it that you want to achieve? What are your long-term goals? Once you have a clear understanding of what you want, it will be easier to let go of the need to control everything. Instead, you can focus on the steps you need to take to achieve your goals. This will help to reduce anxiety and stress, and will also allow you to be more open to opportunities. Another way to reduce anxiety and stress is to take some time for yourself. This can be anything from taking a few minutes to relax and breathe, to going for a walk or taking a yoga class. Taking some time for yourself will help to reduce the amount of stress you're feeling, and will also allow you to focus on what's important to you. When you're feeling stressed, it's easy to get caught up in the things that are causing that stress. However, by taking some time for yourself, you can refocus your attention on the things that matter most to you.

3. Pivot to the sage part of the brain

Once you have identified your self-sabotaging tendencies, it is important to take action to correct them. This may require some soul-searching to determine why you have these tendencies in the first place. Once you know the root cause, you can begin to work on changing your thinking and behaviors. This may be a difficult and challenging process, but it is worth it to achieve your goals and reach your full potential.

 

It is important to be patient with yourself as you work to correct your self-sabotaging tendencies. Change does not happen overnight, and it may take some time to get used to new ways of thinking and behaving. However, if you are persistent and committed to making changes, you will eventually see results. Remember to be patient and kind to yourself throughout the process, and celebrate your successes, no matter how small.

 

If you find yourself struggling to reach your goals or constantly sabotaging your own success, it is important to be aware of your self-sabotaging tendencies. There are three main tendencies: controlling, high achiever, and hypervigilance. Being aware of these tendencies and the thoughts and emotions associated with them can help you to identify when they are in play. Once you have identified your self-sabotaging tendencies, you can take action to correct them. This may require some soul-searching to determine why you have these tendencies in the first place, but it is worth it to achieve your goals and reach your full potential.

 

I love to hear how you apply The 3 Sabotaging Tendencies to get 1. Self-awareness 2. Improved performance 3. Greater satisfaction. Leave me a comment on how it went for you or drop any questions you want me to answer!

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